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The following represents the content we have available in this category:
  
External linkpdf file Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics: 2008 Update At-A-Glance [PDF, 2.64MB] Exit Disclaimer
American Heart Association and American Stroke Assication’s guide to current statistics and the supplement to Heart and Stroke Facts.
External linkpdf file Don't Burn Your Life Away-Be Good to Your Heart/Nais ng mga Pilipino ang Malusog na Puso [PDF, 228KB]
"Don't Burn Your Life Away - Be Good to Your Heart," discusses the harmful effects tobacco abuse can have on the body. Presented within a cultural framework familiar to Filipinos, readers will learn about some harmful chemicals that are in cigarettes and some tips to quit smoking, as well as read testimonies about why people quit smoking.
External linkpdf file Be Active for a Healthy Heart/Nais ng mga Pilipino ang Malusog na Puso [PDF, 184KB]
"Be Active for a Healthy Heart" explains the importance of daily physical activity in the prevention of heart disease. Presented within a cultural framework familiar to Filipinos, readers learn about the benefits of regular physical activity and simple tips they can use for incorporating physical activity into their daily lives
External linkpdf file Keep Your Heart in Check-Know Your Blood Pressure Number/Nais ng mga Pilipino ang Malusog na Puso [PDF, 228KB]
Hypertension is probably the most important risk factor related to heart disease in Filipinos. With the high sodium levels present in many popular dishes, it's important for Filipinos to learn how to keep their blood pressure in check. Presented within a cultural framework familiar to Filipinos, "Keep Your Heart in Check - Know Your Blood Pressure Number," explains what high blood pressure is, how to read your blood pressure number, and ways to keep blood pressure in the normal range.
External link Women and Heart Disease: An Atlas of Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Mortality (Second Edition)
During the past 40 years, public health researchers have documented persistent geographic disparities in heart disease mortality in the United States. However, most of these studies have reported findings only for men. While there is growing awareness that heart disease is the leading cause of death for women, claiming over 372,000 lives in 1995 alone, few studies of heart disease in women have examined geographic disparities. Why is it critical to understand local geographic disparities in the burden of heart disease among women? We contend that health disparities among places reflect underlying inequalities in local social environments that make some communities more health-promoting than others.
External linkpdf file Your Guide to Lowering Your Cholesterol with TLC (Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes)
This easy-to-read guide is based on the National Cholesterol Education Program's guidelines on cholesterol management. These guidelines emphasize the importance of therapeutic lifestyle changes (TLC) -- intensive use of heart-healthy eating, physical activity, and weight control -- for cholesterol management.
External linkpdf file Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart
"Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart" presents comprehensive and easy-to-understand information on the impact of physical activity on your heart, as well as the power of physical activity to keep you healthy overall. Since physical inactivity is one of several major heart disease risk factors that you can do something about, the 44-page guide is full of practical tips, including sample walking and jogging programs, instructions for finding your target heart rate zone, ideas for making fitness a family affair, and an overview of the best physical activities for a healthy heart.
External linkpdf file Your Guide to Lowering Blood Pressure with DASH
Get with the plan that is clinically proven to significantly reduce blood pressure! This updated booklet contains a week's worth of sample menus and recipes recalculated using 2005 nutrient content data. The "Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension" eating plan features plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other foods that are heart healthy and lower in salt/sodium. Also contains additional information on weight loss and physical activity.
External linkpdf file National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Adds New Resource on Heart Health – Your Guide to Living Well With Heart Disease [PDF | 1.55MB]
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health has combined the latest information and guidance on all of the factors that increase risk for heart disease -- or may contribute to worsening heart disease -- into this new heart health guidebook for men and women.
External linkpdf file National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Adds New Resource on Heart Health – Your Guide to a Healthy Heart [PDF, 2.20MB]
The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health has combined the latest information and guidance on all of the factors that increase risk for heart disease -- or may contribute to worsening heart disease -- into this new heart health guidebook for men and women.
External linkpdf file My Blood Pressure Wallet Card
Talk with your doctor about the lifestyle changes that are appropriate for you. Check off the lifestyle changes of this "Blood Pressure Wallet Card" you are going to use to help lower your blood pressure.
External link Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Among American Indians and Alaska Natives (Full Report)
Heart Disease Death Rates, 1996–2000 American Indians and Alaska Natives Ages 35 Years and Older, by County
External link Know the Signs and Symptoms of a Heart Attack
2-page fact sheet provides the signs and symptoms of a heart attack.
External linkpdf file Your Guide to Lowering Blood Pressure
If your blood pressure is between 120/80 mmHg and 139/89 mmHg, then you have prehypertension. This means that you don’t have high blood pressure now but are likely to develop it in the future unless you adopt the healthy lifestyle changes described in this brochure.
External link Stay Young at Heart Recipes - Cooking the Heart Healthy Way
This web site provides links to cooking recipes designed to help you "Stay Young at Heart". It lists a series of appetizers, soups, entrees, side dishes, drinks and even deserts.
External link Heart Information Network - Nutrition Guide Exit Disclaimer
This guide servers to educate and empower consumers and health care professionals to make dietary and lifestyle changes that will improve heart health.
External link Healthier Eating with DASH - A Guide to Lowering High Blood Pressure
Sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, this web site outlines the DASH eating plan which is based on 2,000 calories a day. The number of daily servings in a food group may vary from those listed on this web site depending on your caloric needs.
External link Eating for a Healthy Heart
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration lists steps to take to help prevent heart disease by eating a nutrionally balanced diet and offers tips on staying healthy.
External link American Indian and Alaska Native: Be Active for Your Heart
A series of easy-to-read fact sheets designed to help consumers reduce their chances of having a heart attack or stroke.
External link Healthy Heart Handbook for Women
Every woman should be concerned about heart disease, the leading cause of death for American women. This easy-to-use, easy-to-read, 100-page handbook explains factors that place women at risk of heart disease and recommends steps they can take to protect their heart health. It also has special information for women with heart disease, including warning signs of a heart attack and how to prepare a heart attack survival plan. Other topics covered include hormone replacement therapy, cholesterol, healthy eating, physical activity, how to talk with your doctor, vitamin supplements and, by popular request, heart-smart recipes. Hard copies of this handbook may also be ordered.
External linkpdf file Protect your Heart – Lower your Blood Cholesterol! (Spanish)
Protect your Heart – Lower your Blood Cholesterol!
External link Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Among American Indians and Alaska Natives
Heart Disease Death Rates, 1996–2000 American Indians and Alaska Natives Ages 35 Years and Older, by County
External link Heart attack survivors talk about their experiences Part 2 (Audio file) Exit Disclaimer
Part 2: Bonnie and Joan
External link Heart attack survivors talk about their experiences Part 1(Audio file) Exit Disclaimer
Part 1: Bob Weltner
External link Delicious Heart-Healthy Latino Recipes
Learn to cook some of your favorite, traditional Latino dishes in a heart-healthy way. This bilingual cookbook contains 23 tested recipes that cut down on fat, cholesterol, and sodium but not on taste.
External link Men and Heart Disease: An Atlas of Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Mortality
Men and Heart Disease: An Atlas of Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Mortality
High Blood Pressure - The Silent Killer
You can have high blood pressure (HBP) and still feel just fine. That's because HBP does not cause symptoms. But, HBP (also called hypertension) is a major health problem. If not treated, it can lead to stroke, heart disease, kidney failure, and other health problems. And, African Americans are at higher risk for this disease than any other racial or ethnic group.
External link List of Online Publications from NHLBI
List of Online Publications from NHLBI
External link Refresh Yourself! Stop Smoking
Refresh Yourself! Stop Smoking
External link Energize Yourself! Stay Physically Active
Energize Yourself! Stay Physically Active
External link Embrace Your Health! Lose Weight If You Are Overweight
Embrace Your Health! Lose Weight If You Are Overweight
External link Spice Up Your Life! Eat Less Salt and Sodium
Spice Up Your Life! Eat Less Salt and Sodium
External link Protect Your Heart! Prevent High Blood Pressure
Protect Your Heart! Prevent High Blood Pressure
External link Be Heart Smart! Eat Foods Lower in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol
Be Heart Smart! Eat Foods Lower in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol
External link Empower Yourself! Learn Your Cholesterol Number
Empower Yourself! Learn Your Cholesterol Number
External link The Atlas of Stroke Mortality: Racial, Ethnic and Geographic Disparities in the United States
The Atlas of Stroke Mortality: Racial, Ethnic and Geographic Disparities in the United States is the third in a series of CDC atlases related to cardiovascular disease, which have been published through a collaboration between CDC, West Virginia University, and the University of South Florida. This Atlas provides, for the first time, an extensive series of national and state maps that show local disparities in stroke death rates for the five largest racial and ethnic groups in the United States (i.e., American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asians and Pacific Islanders, blacks, Hispanics, and whites).
External link Frequently Asked Questions About Heart Attack
A great compilation of to-the-point answers about some of the more pressing questions related to heart attack warning signs, pre-hospital delay time, the role of emergency medical personnel and steps to survival.
External link Heart Disease And Medications
Sometimes, medications may be needed to help prevent or control coronary heart disease (CHD) and so reduce the risk of a first or repeat heart attack. But, if medications are needed, lifestyle changes still must be undertaken. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) is given a quick review of some of those medications.
External link Heart Attack Warning Signs
A heart attack is a frightening event, and you probably don't want to think about it. But, if you learn the signs of a heart attack and what steps to take, you can save a life–maybe your own. Check this information and quizzes by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI).
External link What Is a Heart Attack?
A heart attack occurs when the supply of blood and oxygen to an area of heart muscle is blocked, usually by a clot in a coronary artery. Often, this blockage leads to arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat or rhythm) that cause a severe decrease in the pumping function of the heart and may bring about sudden death. If the blockage is not treated within a few hours, the affected heart muscle will die and be replaced by scar tissue.
External link Check Your Cholesterol and Heart Disease I.Q.
Are you cholesterol smart? Test your knowledge about high blood cholesterol with the following statements. Circle each true or false. The answers are given on the back of this sheet.
External link The Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke
An estimated 17 million people worldwide die of cardiovascular diseases, particularly heart attacks and strokes. Many of the risk factors for heart diseases and stroke are preventable or can be controlled, thereby reducing risk. To respond to population health challenges of the global epidemic of heart disease and stroke, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) collaborated with the World Health Organization (WHO) to produce "The Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke."



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