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Cascade AIDS Project (CAP)

Grantee Information

  1. Grantee Organization Name: Cascade AIDS Project (CAP)
  2. Organization Address (Street, City, State, Zip): 208 SW Fifth Ave, Suite 800, Portland, OR 97204
  3. Organization website URL (if any): www.cascadeaids.org Exit Disclaimer
  4. Brief Description of the Organization: Cascade AIDS is a not-for-profit community-based provider of HIV services, housing, education and advocacy in Oregon and Southwest Washington. Cascade AIDS works to prevent HIV infection by combating negative stigma associated with the disease and empowering communities by connecting them with important resources.

Grant Project Information

  1. Title of Grant Project: CHATPdx
  2. Amount of OMH Award: $247,874
  3. Name of Project Director: Michael Anderson-Nathe

Brief Description of the Grant Project

Research has shown that Latino and African American youth in Portland, Ore., are disproportionately impacted by HIV. The CHATPdx project sought to combat the spread of HIV among at-risk minority youth through four key strategies:

  • Peer education as a primary tool of disseminating information,
  • Increasing the availability and accessibility of test sites,
  • Using rapid HIV-testing, and
  • Utilizing technology and social networking sites as channels for improved communication.
The project has also sought to enhance collaborations with stakeholders. Key program activities included facilitating a service learning group on peer education; conducting youth HIV-testing nights; supporting the African American AIDS Awareness Action Alliance that conducted community outreach; and providing technology-based referrals that ensured participant access to rapid testing.

The Cascade AIDS Project expected results of CHATPdx to include the following: that all participants receiving HIV-testing services would demonstrate an enhanced knowledge and understanding of their HIV status; 80 percent of participants would report an increase in access to safer-sex information via social networking and technology sites; and 95 percent of CHATPdx peer educators would report an increase in important social skills necessary for successful peer-to-peer interactions as well as an increase in self-efficacy to modify their own health behaviors. It was also anticipated that youth-serving partner agencies would report an enhanced capacity to offer effective peer education programs.

A mixed-method approach was used to assess the project's progress toward achieving these outcomes. Pre-test and post-test surveys were distributed to participants to collect information pertaining to patient history and knowledge of HIV/AIDS and important preventive behaviors. Quantitative data was collected through client chart abstractions and client referral forms. Furthermore, pre-and post-test focus groups were conducted with peer educators to determine the extent to which peer-to-peer interactions improved knowledge and decreased risky behavior.

Key program findings reported throughout the grant period:

  1. An increased knowledge of serostatus among minority at-risk youth. Over the course of the project, 648 youth were tested for HIV and provided with the results of their test. This was 162 percent above the original goal.
  2. An increased knowledge of participant vulnerability to HIV infection. Out of 126 youth who completed the pre-post survey during HIV testing, 71 percent of individuals reported an increase in their knowledge and awareness of HIV/AIDS and important preventive behaviors. A survey of youth reached through peer education revealed that 85 percent of youth participants reported an increase in their general knowledge of HIV.
  3. Enhanced social skills to practice safer sex and diminish risk of HIV infection. Of the 110 youth who were recruited, trained, and supported CHATPdx as peer educators, 92 percent reported increased social skills.
  4. Social media is an important tool for conducting outreach to youth. Social networking was used to create and invite people to CHATPdx events, pose sexual health-related questions for discussion, and market the programs and services offered through videos and pictures. The CHATPdx project developed the ability to reach and connect with youth through Facebook and Twitter. The Facebook page gained 1,134 fans, 599 wall posts, 12,415 audience interactions, and 188,923 total page views from baseline.

Identified Best Practices

  • Leveraged social media to expand their reach. The CHATPdx project utilized several social media outlets, including Twitter, Facebook, Blogosphere and Tumblr, for youth outreach including notifying youth of HIV/AIDS prevention, education and testing events at their organization and within the community, as well as a venue to pose sexual health related question for discussion. Facebook was a crucial tool for communication engagement, enabling the project to keep youth updated on CHATPdx events in their preferred medium of communication.
  • Engaged youth through a diverse set of activities. Youth were engaged by the CHATPdx project through a diverse set of activities including Stop Motion Animation classes, social media, CHATroom nights, and video and radio production. The diverse set of activities allowed the program to provide outreach to a large number of youth, even if the entire activity was not HIV-focused, and give youth information about the CHATPdx project. Even if the initial touch of the project was only lightly focused on HIV prevention, youth were notified of events and provided information about the services that the project and organization provided. On multiple levels, youth were engaged in HIV prevention and education, whether it was through Facebook discussion, Twitter and Tumblr conversation, videos, classes or HIV testing and discussion at the CHATRoom.

Related National Partnership for Action to End Health Disparities Goals

  • Leadership: Strengthen and broaden leadership for addressing health disparities at all levels.
  • Health System and Life Experience: Improve health and health care outcomes for racial and ethnic minorities and for underserved populations and communities.

Related Healthy People 2020 Objectives & Subobjectives

  • HIV-3 Reduce the rate of HIV transmission among adolescents and adults
  • HIV-4 Reduce new AIDS cases among adolescents and adults
  • HIV-5 Reduce new AIDS cases among adolescent and adult heterosexuals
  • HIV-6 Reduce new AIDS cases among adolescent and adult men who have sex with men
  • HIV-11 Increase the proportion of persons surviving more than three years after a diagnosis with AIDS
  • HIV-13 Increase the proportion of people living with HIV who know their serostatus
  • HIV-14.1 Increase the proportion of adolescents and adults who have been tested for HIV in the past 12 months
  • HIV-14.4 Increase the proportion of adolescents and young adults who have been tested for HIV in the past 12 months
  • HIV-16 Increase the proportion of substance abuse treatment facilities that offer HIV/AIDS education, counseling, and support
  • HIV-17.1 Increase the proportion of sexually active unmarried females aged 15 to 44 years who use condoms
  • HIV-17.2 Increase the proportion of sexually active unmarried males aged 15 to 44 years who use condoms
  • STD-1.1 Reduce the proportion of females aged 15 to 24 years with Chlamydia trachomatis infections attending family planning clinics
  • STD-3.1 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 16 to 20 years enrolled in Medicaid plans who are screened for genital Chlamydia infections during the measurement year
  • STD-3.2 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 21 to 24 years enrolled in Medicaid plans who are screened for genital Chlamydia infections during the measurement year
  • STD-4.1 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 16 to 20 years enrolled in commercial health insurance plans who are screened for genital Chlamydia infections during the measurement year
  • STD-4.2 Increase the proportion of sexually active females aged 21 to 24 years enrolled in commercial health insurance plans who are screened for genital Chlamydia infections during the measurement year
  • STD-5 Reduce the proportion of females aged 15 to 44 years who have ever required treatment for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)
  • STD-6.1 Reduce gonorrhea rates among females aged 15 to 44 years
  • STD-6.2 Reduce gonorrhea rates among males aged 15 to 44 years
  • STD-7.1 Reduce sustained domestic transmission of primary and secondary syphilis among females
  • STD-7.2 Reduce sustained domestic transmission of primary and secondary syphilis among males
  • STD-10 Reduce the proportion of young adults with genital herpes infection due to herpes simplex type 2



Content Last Modified: 8/13/2013 11:30:00 AM
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